11/07/2018

THE SLAVE GIRL - a story in a hundred words


THE SLAVE

 “Who will buy this lovely young virgin?”
“I will,” Petrus said and the hammer fell.

His home was a humble pottery in Stabiae, but a fig-tree shaded the yard, the kitchen was cool, and when Yani gave birth to a son, Petrus freed her.

One day he announced, “I go to sell pots in Surrentum,” and Yani said, “I will come too.”
Petrus stared as she packed all their belongings into the cart. “Shall I bring my wheel?” he joked.
She glanced at the mountain and shivered, clutching her child. “You can buy another – now hurry!”

They were ten miles away when Vesuvius erupted.
......................................................................................................
Stabiae was a small village overlooking the Bay of Naples which, like Pompeii, was buried under metres of volcanic ash when Mt Vesuvius erupted.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stabiae
...................................................
I took this photograph on our village green at Halloween a couple of years ago - this was our local supermarket's offering to the festivities. Thanks to Rochelle for using another of my photos - I shall enjoy reading what the rest of Friday Ficitoneers thought of it. If you are not a FF contributor, you can find us by following the blue frog link from https://rochellewisoff.com/ - after you've left a comment here, of course.

And - if you click on the book cover at the top of this page, that link will take you to the Amazon page where you can buy my new book HELTER-SKELTER, which is the story of Albie, a boy growing up in Kent, South-east England, between the wars - a completely different genre from my last book, A Volcanic Race. For those of you who bought AVR, I am still working on the sequel and hope to publish it in time for Christmas.

44 comments:

  1. That's deceptively complex, Liz.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I hope she's better looking than the one in the photo. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heehee! Thanks for commenting, Russell.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Ah, but they got away!

      Delete
    2. glad they got away :)
      ~Priorhouse

      Delete
  4. I bet he is glad he bought her and treated her well.

    ReplyDelete
  5. There are worse masters. Lucky escape for her twice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She repaid her debt in full, I think.

      Delete
  6. A timely exit. Thanks for a great photo, Liz.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome - I sent Rochelle quite a few, ages ago - this is the second one she's used.

      Delete
  7. It speaks for Petrus that Yani didn't leave him after he freed her. And what a lucky escape they had.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Petrus was blessed that Yani had the gift of Sight.

      Delete
  8. I like your take on the prompt - the mummy in the trolley looks like the figures from Pompeii. I enjoyed reading about two nice people who narrowly avoid a catastrophe. Your prose style is lucid and a pleasure to read.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sounds like he earned her love, in that she stayed with him and that she saved them all

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He did indeed - a nice man by the standards of the day.

      Delete
  10. Oh! Such a different take on the prompt. I love it. Very, very nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Dear Liz,

    I love where you went with your own photo. I can always count on you not to be too literal. ;) Good one, albeit, with a tragic ending.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Rochelle. Tragic for many but not, thanks to her instincts, for Yani and her family.

      Delete
  12. such a different take on the prompt - and really felt a lot of story in such few words...
    nice job

    ~Priorhouse

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Prior - in fact my story started life at 200 words, so it's even more truncated that before!

      Delete
  13. I assumed they made their escape and reading the comments I'm glad I was correct. A small kindness repaid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quite a big kindness, in fact - her freedom!

      Delete
  14. Her instincts kicked in at the right moment! Nicely done Liz and thanks for the photo prompt this week :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Petrus was fortunate in his choice of woman.

      Delete
  15. Ah, thanks, Liz, for the background on the picture. Your local supermarket sounds like a lot of fun and your story is terrific. The characters instantly lived for me. I cared about both of them and you took them off in an imaginative and unexpected direction, Jilly, Sugar on the Bee.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Replies
    1. And gifted. Thanks for commenting, Dawn.

      Delete
  17. i was hoping against hope that they survived. but the story was inspired by this week's photo prompt, do they probably didn't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh but they did! The photo made me think of her enslavement, which she escaped thanks to Petrus.

      Delete
  18. Great piece in so few words.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I really liked your take on your wonderfully imaginative photo! I'm glad to know that they Petrus and Yani survived. I wasn't sure if 10 miles was far enough away to escape such a mighty volcano.

    By the way, Liz, I just noticed that in this big world, you live only 30 miles away from me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? We must meet - I thought most of FF lived in America!

      Delete
  20. Loved your historical fiction. That slave girl had good instincts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She did, and got them away in time.

      Delete
  21. I enjoyed those 100 words - thank you fro sharing.

    ReplyDelete

Do leave a message before you go!