25/08/2016

CAYUCO - a 100 word story


CAYUCO

A fishing boat spotted the ninth cayuco of the year wallowing in the trough between massive full-moon waves, its occupants’ faces grey with sickness and terror.

Tourists took photographs as people struggled up stone steps to policia and medicos, silver blankets and bottled water on the harbour wall. There were disbelieving gasps when another layer was revealed – second-class passengers under the feet of the first, their hair and clothing soaked in brine and vomit.

Just one woman remained, searching desperately through the filth until she found, wedged beneath the lowest seat, a bundle that had stopped crying hours before they sighted land.

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The above photograph, taken by Georgia Koch, is this week's prompt for Friday Fictioneers, hosted by Rochelle. When you've left a comment on my story (please!) you can read other writers' interpretations by following the Blue Frog link from her blog 
https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/
My story is based on fact. When we lived in Tenerife I witnessed similar scenes in  Las Galletas, the village where I shopped - these photos were taken at sea and on the beach there.








18 comments:

  1. Dear Liz,

    This is heart breaker. More so that it's based on facts. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. I will never forget standing on the beach watching this drama unfold.

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  2. So tragic. Very well done, Liz.

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    1. Such tragedies are still happening everywhere, every day.

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  3. I had the same impression when I opened the prompt. We have had similar tragedies in the States. Desperate immigrants, just wanting to find a better life. Tragic.
    Painful to read,
    Tracey @WhatsOnYourMindDoc

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    1. It#s happening in England too, only the cross channel journey is shorter and the French are doing nothing to stop them.

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  4. This is even more than heartbreaking... the many layers from the spectators perspective to the final story about the devastated mother.

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    1. When you've witnessed such tragedies you never forget them.

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  5. This brought tears to my eyes, Liz. You have a real gift in managing to convey so much in so few words.

    Susan at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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    1. Thanks Susan - I enjoy the challenge.

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  6. Very contemporary take. Great write.

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    1. So much is in the news these days.

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  7. A heartbreaking story, even more so since class doesn't stop before desperation. Great writing, Liz.

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    Replies
    1. Those who could pay the people traffickers more got the best seats - survival of the richest at its most basic.

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  8. Thanks Dawn - just thanks.

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Leave a comment, please - I will reply to everyone.