24.2.21

ICHIKA

ICHIKA

 Ichika, whose name means a thousand flowers, knew her only way out of poverty was to marry a rich foreigner. Her photograph on the Agency’s website caught Vincente’s fancy, and after one  meeting he proposed.

His apartment in Malaga wasn’t the palace he had described, but Ichika told herself she was fortunate – Vicente was a considerate husband, she had found a shop that stocked familiar ingredients, and among the flower-beds of the park she almost felt at home.

Then winter came, and the park was buried in snow. Ichika spent her days sitting by the window, an exotic flower dying by slow, cold degrees in a foreign land.

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If this story seems familiar, it is proof that you are one of my faithful readers because, in a slightly different format, it first saw the light of day four years ago! 

Thank you to Dale for the photograph - she takes amazing pictures in her native Canada - and to Rochelle for hosting Friday Fictioneers on her blog, from whence you can navigate via the frog image to read other stories. https://rochellewisoff.com/

My husband and I have had our first jabs, and are looking forward to enjoying more freedom this spring and summer than we did last year. Although, of course, we are always mindful of those who didn't make it, and the grief they've left behind. Yet still there are people who are refusing to have the vaccine without any sensible reason, and whose idiocy - or sense of entitlement - endangers others. 

35 comments:

  1. Oh that is so sad Liz.

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    1. Thank you, Wilts - so are frozen roses.

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    1. Thank you Neil, it felt right when i wrote it.

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  3. Good metaphor for a sad tale. Nicely done.

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  4. This was so beautifully written. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Nichika - is that really your name? How lovely, and thank you!

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  5. The story of oh-so-many young brides who left their homelands seeking better circumstances, sometimes finding out that the better was not quite enough ...

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    1. Perhaps she will begin to settle when they start a family.

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  6. Dear Liz,

    Sad story. At least Vincente is considerate.
    As for the jab, I'm still waiting while my husband has gotten both of his. It's very frustrating the way things are working and not working here. As for the antivaxers don't even get me started.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. The UK has done well with the vaccine so far. We had a high infection rate, which I think is mainly due to the density of our population compared with larger countries. Lots of immigrants too close together too.

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  7. I'd like to think that spring will bring forth buds of hope.

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  8. I hope spring and cherry blossom bring new hope to Ichika.

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  9. The grass is not always greener on the other side of the street/world...

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    1. Let's hope things balance out for her.

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  10. all hopes not lost. she could always look forward to spring and summer and fall.

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    1. She will have to think positive. Thanks for commenting.

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  11. Just like a rose she is wilting ... so sad. But, perhaps, she may see that Vincente was worth it.
    Nicely done, Liz. Be Safe �� … Isadora ��

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    1. She is lucky in her husband, so hopefully she will learn to be happy.

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  12. What a dramatic change for her! I'm hoping that as she adjusts to the people and the clime, that hope will be renewed.

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    1. Such a culture shock must take time to adjust to.

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  13. Oh, spring WILL bring hope and she'll revel in the blossoming roses. Right? Right!

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    1. One hopes so. 75 years ago me mother sailed to England with my father, leaving behind an Australian spring and landing here in winter. She adapted, so there's hope for Ichika.

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  14. Put me in mind of pioneer wives who set out with such high hopes, and endured such hardship. Loneliness was one of the most difficult.

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    1. Especially on those dirt farms miles from anywhere!

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  15. Nicely done, Liz! Being confronted with winter when one is not used to it can be quite the shock (I would imagine)
    And thank you - you're so sweet!

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    1. My son married a Canadian so I look at your photos with his eyes.

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  16. Hopefully, she will come back to life in the spring. Incredible last line and beautifully written story, Liz!

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  17. My story this week is much like yours...different woman, similar situation. Well done.
    Ronda

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