16/12/2020

INVASION

 

INVASION

George returned from the war uninjured.

‘A miracle,’ his father said, happy to have his son back on the farm.

But his mother knew George hadn’t escaped unscathed. The meticulous way her formerly careless boy folded his clothes, the way he jumped when she dropped a saucepan, his insistence on closing all the curtains although blackout was long gone.

Her husband scoffed, ‘It’s just habit – he’ll get over it.’

Then her best coat disappeared, to be found a week later outside the village.

‘We were told to cover the signposts,’ George said.

Finally his father understood – not all injuries are visible.

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THANKS again to Rochelle for hosting Friday Fictioneers even while celebrating Hanukkah, and to Sandra Crook for the intriguing photo prompt. To read other stories, or to join in and write your own, follow the Frog Link from  https://rochellewisoff.com/ . And if you're not here next week, Happy Christmas to everyone!

AND if you haven't sorted out your holiday reading yet, or need books to send as gifts, why not try my LIVING ROCK series, available on Amazon.




34 comments:

  1. The invisible cost of war. Well written Liz

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  2. Not all injuries are visible, indeed.

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    Replies
    1. All kinds of mental troubles lie hidden.

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  3. Oh, well done. The invisible hurts are often the most difficult to heal.

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  4. Oh, that last line. Beautifully done, Liz.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  5. Replies
    1. But I suspect it happened more than once.

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  6. That's a strong piece, Liz

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  7. A very sensitive telling on a very sensitive topic, Liz.

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  8. Well done Liz! Two separate generations of PTSD here. One close to 50 yeaars old, one 3 make this very real

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  9. The invisible injuries are often the hardest to identify and heal.

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  10. Most of us are wounded, aren't we? We go around acting normal, trying to hide / smother / drown our pain. Powerful writing Liz. You made your point in so few words.

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  11. Dear Liz,

    The father's a little slow on the uptake. Not all scars are visible to the eye, are they?

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    Replies
    1. Perhaps his father didn't want to see it? Thanks Rochelle.

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  12. So sad Lizy. But so true.

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  13. That was a powerful story, Liz. Well done.

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  14. The scars of war were often invisible. A poignant piece Liz.

    My story!

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    Replies
    1. This young man hid his very well, but a. Mother always knows.

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  15. in war there are no victors, only casualties.

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    Replies
    1. You are right, and thanks for reading.

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  16. How many come back like George, or worse?

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  17. A powerful and true story. Thanks for sharing and for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

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