22/11/2017

THE GLORY-HOLE - a story in one hundred words

THE  GLORY-HOLE

Maggie knew that downsizing didn’t mean just moving somewhere smaller, but she hadn’t realised how much junk she’d accumulated. Every drawer and cupboard was jam-packed with forgotten stuff.
“Most of this should go to charity,” she muttered, wrinkling her nose as she flicked through her wardrobe, and she filled several bin-liners without a qualm.

The glory-hole wasn’t so easy, though there was nothing of value. She didn’t need Georgia’s christening candle, or the scarf she’d worn to Mark’s wedding, and heaven only knew why she’d kept those baskets, but how could she dump the clock that stopped the day Derek died? 
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Thanks to Rochelle for the photo prompt this week - I wonder if that cupboard is in her own home? - and for hosting Friday Fictioneers on her blog  https://rochellewisoff.com/

My own week has been filled with the excitement of publishing my first novel on Amazon. A Volcanic Race is a fantasy suitable for teen to adult readers, and is available in print or ebook.  If you like my flash fiction, why not buy yourself a copy for some relaxing reading during the coming festive season?

49 comments:

  1. Is there any reason to be suspicious of the clock that stopped when Derek died?! Congratulations on your novel, look forward to checking it out.

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    1. I see it a a memento - I hadn't considered it as an object of suspicion, but now you mention it ...

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  2. We do hang onto things, don't we? But I'd certainly keep the clock - although it would be a very bitter-sweet memento.

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    1. I have done well in the past - first we cleared out loads of rubbish before moving abroad, then two years ago we did the same to move back.

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  3. We have an apparent distrust on our memories that we resort to hoarding trinkets. It becomes an issue only when we start overdoing it. Nicely done, Lizy. Congratulations on your novel. I'll be sure to check it out shortly.

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    1. Objects, like photos, do help to jog the memory.

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  4. Poor Maggie - I think she should keep the clock. I regret not keeping more mementos from my parents.

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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    1. I am looking through Mum's photo albums now, scanning some to keep in case the albums get lost!

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  5. Dear Liz,

    Congrats on the novel. I will look it up. As for Maggie, we do accumulate to fill our space don't we? Going the other way is quite another thing altogether. Good one.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. Even now I have a storage chest containing things that won't fit in this flat!

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  6. Okay, so keep the clock and lose everything else.

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    1. You're right, except maybe for that scarf...

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  7. Congrats for the book... I am in the process of finishing up an anthology on poetry so I know a bit of the work... Love the story, and a familiar feeling for some of the spaces we have at home

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    1. Thaks Bjorn. Let us know when the anthology comes out.

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  8. Great title and story and a tragic revelation at the end.
    Congratulations on the book, Liz. So happy for you .

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    1. I did wonder whether the title would mean anything to Americans but I couldn't think of a more appropriate one!

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  9. Nothing of monetary value, perhaps. It's tricky when you reach the memories. Well done on the novel!

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    1. Not all value can be summed up in money, can it?

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  10. I love the word 'glory-hole'. We had one of those when I was growing up. Great story.

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    1. I wonder where the word originated?

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  11. However hard we try not to, I'm sure almost every collects a certain amountof junk.

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  12. Yes, sentimentality has a powerful effect on our actions.
    Well done, Liz.

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    1. Thanks Helen. For some of us, emotions do sometimes get the better of common sense.

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  13. Sometimes a silly trinket represents the most poignant memento. Congrats on your book!

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    1. I hae a pair of baby shoes that all four of my children wore. Would I throw them away? Not bl**dy likely!

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  14. As an avid encourager of all my FF friends, I will be looking for your book.
    As for the keeping stuff as mementos... guilty as charged but am working really hard on getting rid of most of them.

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    1. Thanks Dale. If you have space, slide your momentoes sideways for a year or two before the final trip to the bin.

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  15. I have a cupboard like that and I've been thinking about clearing it for years! I'm still thinking. Nice one liz.

    Click to read my FriFic!

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    1. when you reach a certain age you start to think - what would the children think of all this junk? That clarifies things a bit.

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  16. Was it the clock that stopped with his heart, or his heart that stopped with the clock? Cause and effect...Questions questions... :-)

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    1. Neither cause nor effect but empathy, perhaps?

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  17. She shouldn't give it up! And congrats on your book :)

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  18. You're right, some things we can't and shouldn't part with, they're too important to us, even if they're only things. Lovely piece of writing

    Very many congratulations on your book Liz! Wonderful news and it looks like a great read.

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    1. Thaks Lynn. I hope lots of people agree with you and buy it :)

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  19. Lovely story Liz. The meaning of the title in urban slang is entirely different, so I was expecting a very salacious story when I clicked on the link.

    Congratulations on the novel. Well done indeed.

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    1. Haha! Hope you weren't disappointed!

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  20. That last sentence makes it a story, well told.

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    1. Thank you for visiting my blog.

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  21. Oh, that would be a tough one, but perhaps she needed to let go of it and celebrate all he brought to her life before the clock stopped.

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    1. That's probably her best option - in a smaller place there's no room for a non-functioning clock!

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  22. Congratulations on the novel. I liked this story, particularly the mix between the confidence in what she's doing and her final uncertainty.

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    1. thanks for your thoughtful comment, Rachel.

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  23. Sadly, I'm the opposite of your protagonist. I don't save anything. If it isn't needed than out it goes. I wonder which is better. I sort of like the idea of saving something. The clock gave me that feeling. It should be kept. I enjoyed your interpretation of the photo prompt immensely. Congratulations on your book. May you have an abundance of sales.
    Isadora 😎

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  24. Oooppsss ... I forgot to ask you something, "Did you know that glass blowing artists call the oven where they put glass into melt 'The Glory Hole'. 😎

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  25. Congrats on the book!

    Your story is a slice of life. Those possessions sneak up on us--and some are harder to let go of for sure.

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  26. Our intentions are good but we have sentimental attachments to some things. Your story shows this well. Good writing, Liz. All the best with your book. :) --- Suzanne

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