10/05/2017

STRIKE THREE - flash fiction

STRIKE  THREE

I only noticed strike one in retrospect – he forgot names and muddled dates, but doesn’t everyone?

The second strike was more troubling. I’d often catch him standing with a lost expression, clearly wondering where he was, but a gentle word would bring him back. Never one to listen to other opinions, he became angrier, and so illogical it was useless trying to reason with him.


But when he backed the car into the gatepost, stormed into the kitchen shouting, “Who put that blasted pillar there?” and then demanded, “What are you doing in my house?” – that was strike three.
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Those who have lived through similar scenarios will understand where this story comes from.
Thanks to Rochelle for hosting Friday Fictioneers on  https://rochellewisoff.com/  and also for bravely sharing the photograph of her accident - I hope the insurance covered it?

32 comments:

  1. Oh! That's so poignant, Liz. Painfully so.

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    1. Thanks Helen - such situations are painful, for the sufferers and those around them.

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  2. Such a difficult thing to live through... for both the afflicted and their family...
    Well done!

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  3. Beautifully and heart-wrenchingly written.

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  4. I have seen those steps closely... I think it's not quite the same, but definitely things I see in retrospect.

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    1. Dementia takes every sufferer differently, but the signs are similar in my experience.

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  5. Tragic tale, and the worst part of it is the story still to come.

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    1. I'm afraid you're right, Iain.

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  6. So sad, Liz. Yes, I know exactly where you're coming from there and am starting to see similar behaviour in one elderly relative in particular. That gradual erosion of self - it's a tragedy, isn't it? Very touchingly told

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    1. It is sad, and once you've seen it personally there is no mistaking the signs.

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  7. Dear Liz,

    Brilliant depiction of the downward Alzheimer's spiral. Touching and tragic without being maudlin.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    PS The insurance company of the owner of the other car paid for all repairs on the car. The sad part is that she had loaned her car to a friend who neither spoke English nor had a driver's license.

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    1. Thank you Rochelle. It is a downward path, though with the occasional plateua and even an upward step or two, but the outcome is inevitably the same.
      ps. I am surprised an insurance company paid up if the actual driver wasn't legally allowed to drive!

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  8. Well told, Liz. I agree with Rochelle your story is poignant without being maudlin.

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  9. Oh! This is tragic, indeed. Well written.

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    1. Any degenerative disease is tragic. Thanks for commenting.

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    1. Thanks for commenting, Dahlia.

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  11. Yep. I'm familiar with dementia & Alzheimers. It pays to not argue, you'll only throw gas on the fire. In a couple of minutes they'll move on and forget what was such a crisis only seconds before. - Russell

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    1. I know, Russell, and I try, but after a lifetime of standing my ground it's very hard to bite my tongue!

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  12. Brilliant exposition of the downward spiral.

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  13. Wow - that was brilliantly depicted in such a short story - very well done!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  14. So sad, to watch someone succumb slowly over time.

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  15. A fate I hope doesn't befall me.

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  16. Good writing, Liz. Thank goodness my mother who had Alzheimer's never drove a car. Also, thank goodness we went to a lawyer after my dad died and she moved in with us and I got a Power of Attorney to handle her legal matters. He suggested she sell dad's car to me for a dollar to make it legal, which she did. ---- Suzanne

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    1. I went to a Dementia Awareness meeting last night and learned some useful tips for dealing with someone with the disease. I have already discussed with OH setting up POAs, reciprocal, of course!

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