15/03/2017

GRANDA'S WATCH - short fiction in 100 words

GRANDA’S  WATCH

Granda and Nanna’s cottage smelled of smouldering peat, and there was always a chunk of buttered brack to eat with tea.
Julie loved helping Nanna cook and pod peas, but her favourite thing was Granda’s pocket watch. He would prise it open with his thick thumbnail, saying, ‘There he goes!’ but Julie was never quite quick enough to see the tiny man who chimed the hours. Granda would pinch her cheek and chuckle, ‘Next time, poppet.’

Now Julie’s children play computer games and are healthily sceptical, but even they keep trying to catch a glimpse of the little chiming man.
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This week's photo brought two things to mind - the Laxie Wheel on the Isle of Man, and a huge Dollar I saw in Canada - neither of which I have written about! Jennifer Prendergast took the photo which Rochelle used for the Friday Fictioneers' prompt on her blog  https://rochellewisoff.com/  You can follow the link from there to read other stories, after you've left a comment on mine!

33 comments:

  1. That was so lovely, Liz!

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  2. Ooh, the nostalgia! I loved that opening, Liz, and the idea of the tiny man is just gorgeous.

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    1. Nostalgia, but also a nod to the cottage my daughter and her husband are renovating right now.

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  3. I love that Julie and her children and her children hold on to a spark of wonder, even when the world seems to want to bury it all. I bet she'll see the little man any day now... :)

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    1. In my opinion there is magic in believing in fairy tales.

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  4. Sweet nostalgIc tale Lizy. Liked it.

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    1. It's good to do 'sweet' sometimes. Thanks for commenting, Iain.

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  5. How does the tiny man get in again?

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    1. He never leaves, just hides behind the cog wheels.

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  6. Dear Liz,

    I love the imagination and innocence of little ones. You've captured both in this sweet story.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. That imagintaion needs a little help from adults at times.

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  7. Totally delightful. Such is the stuff of memories.

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    1. There's a little man inside every chiming clock though only the privileged few have seen one.

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  8. A nice feel-good story, Liz. Enjoyed it.

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  9. I the greater complexity of the modern age we often miss those simpler things of childhood. Nicely remembered.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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    1. Children and grandchildren bring it all back, Arlee!

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  10. Sweet story. Nicely done.

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  11. nostalgia is good for the soul. well done.

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  12. Good story. Children always like a bit of whimsey.
    (I hope someday Blogspot installs a Like button on their blogs.)

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    1. A like button would stop people from leaving a proper comment, so I think i'd rather not have one!

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  13. Replies
    1. Thank you - glad to be of service!

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  14. Yay for the kids to keep their curiosity despite all the computer games. Lovely story.

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