22/04/2016

UNDER THE WIRE - Flash Fiction for Friday

UNDER THE WIRE

Thousands of souls wait behind the wire, their faces etched with the pain of homes abandoned, lives destroyed, families lost in the frantic flight from conflict.
 In the midst of chaos there is routine. Women turn tents and pallets into homes and gossip in laundry-sheds, men pace the paths watchfully, children make mud pies or chant lessons in small groups. 
A people in suspension.
 Hamet crouches by the wire, solitary and yearning, until the day he finds some pliers. 
Stealthily he snips and rolls under the wire - into the camp  to join the other muddy, anonymous children around the food tent.
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This week's photograph was taken by Madison Woods, and I suspect I will not be the only one of Friday Fictioneers to have thought of refugee camps. To read the others, go to https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/ and follow the Blue Frog link.

23 comments:

  1. The human spirit is beautifully portrayed.

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  2. Faultlessly written, Lizy - you have painted a perfect, vivid picture.

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  3. Sadly there was no twist, no happy ending. Just - as the others have commented - perfectly vivid.

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    1. For Hamed the happy ending was food.

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  4. I really like how you describe the normality of a terrible situation.. it's often what strike me most, how soon humans adopt to terrible conditions... great write.

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    1. Thank you, Bjorn - I value your opinion.

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  5. sadly, this story never grows old just the characters change through the years.

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    1. Yes - even Moses and his people were refugees.

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  6. Vivid and convincing. Well done Liz.

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  7. I have to agree with Björn... a less-than-ideal situation that has become their norm... Well portrayed, Liz

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    1. People will make homes wherever they must, particularly if they have children.

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  8. Dear Liz,

    Heart breaking. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. Thanks Rochelle - and congratulations on your four years' leadership.

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  9. Hamed has reached his goal, he doesn't have to go hungry any longer. And sad situation or not, I for one applaud the spirit of the people in the camp.

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    1. At least they aren't being bombed while they wait for a solution to their plight.

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  10. This is a very poignant piece. It captures the essence and ability of the human spirit to adapt under the worse conditions, and carry on, perhaps with less hope, but out of necessity. Well written. :)

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    1. Thank you Wild Child - humans wouldn't have survived this long if they weren't infinitely adaptable.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  11. Deeply moving and powerful, Liz. Such desperation one must feel, in being thrust into these conditions. I feel like too many people don't get, or don't want to understand, that there's no choice involved... just loss, suffering, and unbearable choices. Beautiful story!

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    1. thank you, Dawn, for such a thoughtful comment.

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