01/12/2013

SHOW AND TELL SUNDAY

poinsettia
First things first - apologies for absence. I have been busy lately rewriting a novel - I'll tell you about that another time - and my blogs have been infrequent, to say the least. So I have decided to kick-start it again with a "Show and Tell Sunday", and if I have any followers and visitors left, please leave a comment to encourage me to continue!


Christmas is coming in Tenerife as well as the rest of the world, and one of our first signs is the poinsettias coming back to full colour in the gardens. We also have Los Reyes - The Kings - waiting on the roundabout to be lit up at night.


For those of you who have been following the avalanche story - here is this morning's set of photographs.
When the workmen told me it would take twenty days, they should have added 'probablemente' - this is manana country, after all!


People have been blaming the rock-fall on the heavy rain we had two days earlier - our first in over a year - but I think it is more likely to be due to the banana plantation perched on top. This is a closeup of the cliff through which they cut the access road when building the autopista 25 or so years ago -  Huge rocks, so heavy that I cannot lift a head-sized one - interspersed with gravel layers riddled with holes in which the local pigeons nest.

Twenty-five years of steadily-seeping water - we are lucky there wasn't a school built at the base of the cliff.

Steady as a rock? I will never use that phrase again without visualising this - and  yes, that side road really IS that steep!


5 comments:

  1. Good pics, Liz. I'll think of them when we drive in the Sierras and see large lumps of rock scattered here and there on the road!

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  2. That mixture of heavy rock and gravel was surely an accident waiting to happen. I've had trouble keeping up with blogging lately so I do understand. I suppose we do what we can :-)

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  3. From the stories I heard when living in Granada province, Building regs. are not high on the agenda in Spain, especially now, if costs can be cut. I hope they take a bit more care this time.

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  4. I'm still here Liz! And there's no need to apologise for writing!!! I'm looking forward to hearing all about it.

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  5. I never think of poinsettias actually growing in the ground - they seem so winter-related and only ever come in pots. And they die in the heat indoors.
    Yes, I'd think the banana plantation had a part to play - they must need a lot of watering, surely? - but the rock strata is unstable to start with.
    By the way, well done on the finishing of the novel (first draft?) - take the day off, Ms Y!
    Lorraine

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