08/04/2013

GYPSY, GEORGE AND GUAZA MAN

   GYPSY When Albie’s mother abandons him she calls him a “gypsy brat” and tells him that her latest man friend doesn’t want him around. From that moment Albie is determined to find out if this was just another jibe or if he really does have Romany blood in his veins.

In the early 1900s the hop-fields and fruit farms of Kent, where my novel Helter-Skelter is set, are rich in travelling folk who, although they are still regarded with suspicion by the locals, are a necessary part of the labour force.


Meanwhile GEORGE & DOT SMITH become Albie’s parents by taking him into their home. George is a big, working class man – a patient grandfather who takes pity on the young waif Albie, and Dot is strong-willed but kind and motherly. She is a typical housewife of her era, who wears a wrap-over pinny all day, makes nourishing meals on very little money, and can’t stand bad behaviour. Come to think of it, she’s not unlike me – except for the apron!




As we drive home from Las Galletas, the fishing village a few kilometres away where we do our shopping and drink cafe con leche, we pass through GUAZA, where the mountain looks so like a recumbent figure that he is known as GUAZA MAN.

12 comments:

  1. Love the photo, it looks like a gorgeous place.

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  2. I'm getting more and more intrigued by Helter-Skelter. Look forward to reading it when it is published.

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  3. Well Liz! it looks as though you are going to pull us by the nose to the end of the Alphabet. What will be next post I wonder. Like Robert I am becoming intrigued.

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  4. Managed a few G's there, do like the story.

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  5. Anna - presume you mean the wagon in the meadow?
    Rob and Maurice - I hope the book will be available for you to read one day. As you know, I am working on it now.
    Bill - I think I have finally managed to follow your blog without having to join "Circles"! Good to meet another Aussie.

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  6. Interesting post Lizy. It sounds an interesting story.

    I can recall seeing the hops growing up the poles in the fields when I went on the train to the seaside as a child.

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  7. Poor Albie. I love the photo. Couldn't see the reclining man for a start then I got him :-)
    Rosalind Adam is Writing in the Rain

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  8. Great photo! I worked out the man silhouette!

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  9. Your story concept is intriguing and I like the picture of the wagon. Is that digital? It's lovely.

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  10. I'm afraid I can't take credit for the wagon picture - straight off the internet! And Guaza Man - I drove up that road a dozen times before I saw it. Welcome to my new visitors.

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